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Germantown Man Serving Aboard Aircraft Carrier



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A 2008 Walkersville High School graduate and Germantown, Maryland, native is serving on one of the world’s largest warships, the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan.

Airman Keith Brown is an aviation ordnanceman aboard the San Diego-based ship, a Nimitz-class nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and one of only ten operational aircraft carriers in the Navy today.

“I assemble and disassemble, bombs, missiles and rockets for all different types of aircraft on board the USS Reagan,” said Brown

Named in honor of former President Ronald Reagan, the carrier is longer than 3 football fields, at nearly 1,100 feet long. The ship is 252 feet wide and weighs more than 100,000 tons. Two nuclear reactors can push the ship through the water at nearly 35 mph.


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As a sailor with numerous responsibilities, Brown said he is proud to serve his country aboard an aircraft carrier.

“I like how everybody in my department gets along which helps boost morale,” said Brown.

Brown also said he is very proud of the work he is doing as part of USS Ronald Reagan’s nearly 3,000-member crew, helping protect America on the world’s oceans.

Sailors’ jobs are highly varied aboard USS Ronald Reagan. Nearly 3,000 men and women make up the ship’s company, which keeps all parts of the aircraft carrier running smoothly — this includes everything from washing dishes and preparing meals to handling weaponry and maintaining the nuclear reactors. Another 2,000 or so form the air wing, the people who actually fly and maintain the aircraft.

“I never cease to be impressed with the type and quality of work that goes on aboard the carrier each day,” said Capt. Christopher E. Bolt, the carrier’s commanding officer. “Our team is filled with highly qualified young adults – in many cases, 19 and 20 years old – and they’re out here launching and recovering aircraft, running a complex propulsion system safely, serving as air traffic controllers, operating sophisticated electronics, and keeping this floating city alive and functioning. Their work ethic, enthusiasm, and esprit de corps are second to none. If you pick up a newspaper in any city and examine what other 19- and 20-year-olds are doing, there is no comparison to the level of responsibility our Sailors hold. That caliber of Sailor is what has earned us the title of America’s Flagship.”